click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN 14
FBC 4
MSNBCW 3
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 2
LINKTV 2
CNBC 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
SFGTV2 1
WRC 1
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
before, and have bid have a conversation on how we reduce our deficits further in a sensible way. -- i would have a conversation about how to reduce our deficits in a sensible way. we can talk about how we can make sure we finance our workers getting properly trained and are schools getting the education they deserve. there is a whole growth agenda that is important does well. -- as well. what you have not seen as the notion that has been presented so far by the republicans that deficit reduction will only cover spending cuts, that we will raise the debt ceiling dollar for dollar on spending cuts. there are a whole set of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sens
it back. >>> time 7:17. some fall lists -- 7:10. some analysts say california's budget deficit could possibly be solved by getting oil out of shale in monterey. the monterey shale runs from los angeles to san francisco and macon obtain more than 400 billion barrels of oil. but getting it out, that's tricky. because of the san andre causes fault, the shale rock is not flat so drilling for oil is difficult. however, the u.s. energy information estimates more than $15 -- more than 15 billion barrels of oil can be recovered using new technology. >>> 7:11. how to move forward. the big debate taking place in newtown, connecticut, one month after the tragic school shooting. >> also, what will lance armstrong say? new details about his big interview with oprah just hours away. >>> it's cold out there. lots of upper 20s, 30s. doesn't matter. some of the wind chills in the teens. it will be sine but it is a little -- sunny but it is a little breezy. >>> one month after the newtown, connecticut shooting people there are now talking about what should be done with the building to sandy hook eleme
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
that deal with the deficit and also have a vision and the stability in what is going to happen in terms of the voting of economic growth. estimate what the peak to the cut a piece of that. the spending on health not necessarily the biggest cost of the deficit right now but if you look at 20 years, for 30 years it is the alligator that is going to swallow everything. i was on a panel last week and there was a lively argument around should we raise the age for medicare, should we try to change the system and have a fee for service, has the obama administration done a lot to lower the cost of health care going forward so we don't need to do much more? what do you think is in practical terms what needs to be done on health care if you poll people they say we all want to cut medicare celerity want to go dealing with that piece of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a
s. >> while i'm willing to find middle ground to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate. not paying its bills is irresponsible. it's absurd. republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect or ransom in exchange for not crashing the america economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being res
can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and certainly not because seniors currently benefiting from them don't deserve with they've been promised. because real leadership isn't about making the easy choice, it's about maybing the right choice. social
and deficit reduction plan. the debt ceiling and all around it doesn't really solve the problem. it is a waste of time. adam: let me interrupt you because we have had this debt ceiling essentially part of our discussion for almost 100 years, going back to 1917 with the issue of liberty bonds. now today we talk about the debt ceiling and we talk about its impact, this debate for the people who are watching, and, getting to this craziness we see the market reacting in a way you can't anticipate. what would happen to our 401(k) if congress he said they have to get together, i was thinking two words, "good luck." whether they can't do something? >> if they don't raise the debt ceiling and let's say we get debt downgrades, the market has a fit basically and drops as they did in 2011, all our investments will get hit. the stock market will go down as it did in a big way in the summer of 2011. on the other hand, if they extend the limits, the debt ceiling limit and do something more, maybe not a grand compromise, something more in terms of deficit reduction, my guess is the market will kind of shrug
would be able to reduce the deficit by $150 billion. not a bad idea. and then if you could do all this and would only cost the average driver less than $1 per week per car, would that be a reasonable burden to impose? so i'm floating the idea. we are beginning discussions with senator mark warner of virginia. he was part of the gang of six, gang of eight. we are encouraged by what we're hearing from him. chairman bill shuster in the house came to our meeting in pittsburgh in november, and he said, listen, folks, we know that the central question congress will have to address next year is revenue. we are open to ideas. no guarantee that they can pass anything. but bill shuster is open to any and all ideas. so what i'm asking you to do is to join us in the battle that lies ahead this next couple of years and demand that congress provide long-term funding for transportation. you know, the big issue that every member of congress is concerned about is with deficits, long-term fiscal viability of the country and cutting spending and raising revenue, that combination is what people seem
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
of all, we've had some deficit reduction. the president laid out a couple days ago. we had over $2 # trillion. we had a trillion and a half that came from previous actions, and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reduction through increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. we already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we've never tried that before. >> host: is it feasible? >> guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a debt beat nation, really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, second hand, that the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some of it realizes that the potential consequences. >> host: if president obama won, so to speak on the fiscal clif
the debt ceiling. this is the question we posed. is reduce the federal deficit a worthy goal? this is interesting you may recall white house press secretary made news by stating that deficit reduction is, quote not a worthy goal onto itself. 77% of voters disagree with them and that includes large majorities of republicans, independents and democrats. what is your take on this? >> again i don't want to be a downer here, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23%
politicians and the commanders on the ground are creating a large deficit of trust. after "rolling stone" interview in which mcchrystal slammed obama and members of the administration, he was forced to resign. he said he did not end as he would have wished. today he says he has moved on with his life and is now free to speak his mind. >> afghanistan is hard. it's always been hard. if you study their history, it's never anything but complex and difficult. >> i spent a career carrying typically an m-16 and later an m-4 carbine. i personally don't think there is any need for that kind of weaponry on the streets, and particularly in and around the schools in america. i like the fact that chuck hagel has had his feet in the mud as a soldier. i like the fact that he's had a lot of background. >> joining me now is the former top commander in afghanistan, retired general stanley mcchrystal. he has a brand-new memoir called "my share of the task." general, nice to see you. >> good to see you, chuck. >> we have heard you on a number of topics. it was interesting on the assault weapon. i want to st
. he will have to talk a lot more in the state of the union about deficit control. we have this new fox poll out tonight to. people are upset about fiscal cliff deal. when asked if their paycheck is smaller this year because of more taxfuls being taken out 60% say yes 25% say no. he is going to have to talk about more deficit reduction. they will do a will little partying this weekend they real lives it's right back to work, bill. >> word of a solution to prevent the united states from defaultingen its debt. the house majority leader eric cantor saying that lawmakers will vote next week on a short-term plan to let the government borrow more money effectively raising the debt ceiling. the deal not all worked out just yet. but apparently it this will not require the spending cuts that house republicans had wanted. just released fox news poll finds that 69% favor raising the debt limit only if there are major spending cuts involved. and 23% say it's reckless not to raise it regardless. the poll also shows more than 8 in 10 think government spending is out of control. only 11% believes it's
deficit and trillion dollar plus deficits every single year. we just cannot afford it. so it requires thoughtfulness and it requires that we are going to have a plan to work through this. i think that that's where we as republicans are headed. >> congresswoman marsha blackburn, thank you for taking the time to talk to us. michael, let me get back to you in this meeting that speaker boehner is going to be having and convince that he's going to have to do to conservative members of his party. how tough a sell job? >> i think it's tough. one reason it's tough, i was struck by the congresswoman's comments. i think there is fundamental disagreement about what it would mean not to just have a clean raising of the debt ceiling. so, in other words, if i heard the congresswoman correctly, i think she was reflecting a sense among some people that you could shut down the government, stop paying some bills, pay other bills, pay interest on the debt, for instance, and we could kind of get through it that way. i think a lot of -- a lot of other republicans, a lot of conservatives, and almost all de
be asked to testify whether or not psycho paths have affective deficits. absolutely they do. there has been hundreds of years of psychiatric research shows that they do. you have this two prong thing. on the one hand more dangerous if you release them and don't treat them. on the other hand, they're affectively different. there was a very nice article in the "new york times" magazine on mother's day about children who have these emerging traits and how we would develop and understand and treat them. it's a small percentage. my goal is to develop better treatment so they can keep them off that trajectory towards life course persistent problems. >> are you saying that people that have the brain structure that you have identified will always be lacking in volitional control or impulse receive to the extent that they are criminals? do we have a subset of people that are criminals because of their brains? >> i should really differentiate psychopathy from criminality. there are a lot of reasons why individuals engage in different criminal activity. it's a very small percentage of prisoners that a
in a night of revelry in paris. it seems, he writes in his memoir, a deficit of trust existed between him and the president's men. a former black operations specialist, the general is very slick on the book circuit, blocking and passing adroitly when the questions get into the weeds. his political outlook is liberal, having admittedly voted for obama in 2008. he speaks the language of the left, eshoeing any queries about his dealings with president obama and preferring to emphasize soft power and what he calls his ballistic relationship with people. if the reader is look for an spraipgz of how he was ambushed by rolling stone, the general is mostly mute. a commander naive enough to think a reporter who hears thinks doesn't make them public. he actually said he was surprised by the tone and direction of the article. what is astounding, with all the money and manpower that the pentagon has spent on media relations, all the military strategizing, nobody seems to have gained much sophistication if in dealing with the press since the war on vietnam. he sprinkles the book with great warriors an
] [applause] >> former senators kent conrad and judd gregg lead a discussion on debt and deficit issues like it 8:30 a.m. here on c-span 2. at 1:00 p.m. eastern, new immigration legislation, live from the national press club on c-span 2. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> it was an important part of history. i felt the fdic perspective should be brought to bear. there had been some other accounts of the crisis that i thought were not completely accurate, especially in terms of what we did and what i did so with the was important for a historical record to present our perspective and also, currently, for people to understand that there were different policy choices, a different policy options and disagreements and that if we want to prevent this crisis from happening again, i really felt the public themselves need to engage more in financial reform and educate themselves better and make it an issue with their elected officials. i wanted to make the book accessible and i had recommendations to help them do that. >> the former head of the federal deposit insurance corporation
to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a deadbeat nation really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, secondhand, much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some realizes the potential consequences. host: if
stating very clearly today that he will not negotiate deficit reduction, tax increases and spending cuts attached to the debt ceiling. this of course does follow that bruising battle the year before last, where he did negotiate on the issue, and the u.s. nearly went to the brink of default. he said that congress has to pay the bills that it's already racked up. >> you don't go out to dinner and then, you know, eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. and if you do, you're breaking the law. and congress should think about it the same way that the american people do. you don't -- now, if congress want, to have a debate about maybe we shouldn't go out to dinner next time, maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. that's the debate that we should have. >> reporter: in this press conference that was called last minute in the east room, president obama said he will negotiate a deal on deficit reduction but not, as he put it, quote, with a gun to the head of the american people. as you know, joe, republicans are saying they're not going to increase the debt c
disease to addiction, parenting to attention deficit disorder, his work focuses on the centrality of early childhood experiences to the development of the brain and how those who experience these experiences can impact everything from behavioral patterns to pca
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is
. for decades we have piled for decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children's future for the temporary convenience of the present. to continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals. you and i, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we're not bound by that same limitation? we must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. and let there be no misunderstanding -- we are going to begin to act, beginning today. [applause] the economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. they will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. they will go away because we as americans have the capacity now, as we've had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom. in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. [applause] from time to time we've been tempted to belie
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
talking about deficit, government spending 1520 years ago when nobody was that much focused on it. they are now. here's a chance for you to take what you learned on the way up, what you learned on the way down, what you learned in congress before, what you learned in the governorship and apply it to what is really the debate of our time. >> you will remember his governorship, which was riddled with that story where he admitted an affair with a woman from argentina back in 2009. >>> look at this, unless you're a little claustrophobic. this oregon woman spent nearly four hours trapped in an eight-inch space between an apartment building and a 20-foot wall. this happened early wednesday morning in downtown portland. apparently she fell from a second floor smoking area and getting her out was not easy. firefighters had to cut through a section of wall and used air bags to widen the space. lieutenant rich chapman is the firefighter who pulled that woman out. >> we were assuring her we were doing everything to get her out. we weren't going home without her. that was it. we used basicall
remains committed to further reducing the deficit in a balanced way. so that is the response from the white house after the gop at its retreat in virginia came out with the possibility that perhaps we could extend the debt limit for another three months but the senate has to pass a budget, so the republicans which it has not done in four years. so. tracy: no surprise from the white us house. ashley: says no. tracy: okay, then. how about this. hank paulson says he hates the debt limit. you remember the former treasury secretary, the guy who said i need $700 billion right now? no wonder he hates it. ashley: don't we all. tracy: he has given a rare interview. we have details on that next. ashley: first a look at today's winners and losers. the dow just above the water mark. take a look. we'll be right back. ♪ chances are you've become, a better driver over the years. and one company thinks your auto insurance rates should get better too. presenting the aarp auto insurance program from the hartford. i'm a good driver. have been for years. it just makes sense that better, more experi
and republicans. out of that, hopefully, some progress being made to get this deficit and debt under control. we believe our obligation is to help prevent a debt crisis from hitting this country. republicans have had a tough spot here. the president of united states as he is not negotiating the debt ceiling. he says it is simply up to congress. it is due to spending that is already approved. the majority of republicans voted against the deal because there were no spending cuts. this was the first strategy session. we are going to have these fights throughout the spring. back to you. cheryl: we just had a guest trying to tell us to avoid the noise in washington. thank you very much, rich. dennis: let's take a look at apple shares right now. down five dollars. 1%. another tip today. an analyst says do not hang up on the iphone maker. that cancellation of orders for iphone parts, it is not tied to sell drop in demand for iphone5. apple is moving toward so-called -- screens from different suppliers. analyst who are usually critical of apple came out and said, look, this recent sellout, way overdone.
to finance the government deficit, buying a lot of government bonds and at some point that is going to come apart and it might come apart, might come apart in a fashion that is rather like august of 2007 where things seem to be going smoothly and then all of a sudden it all falls apart and the question is do we have adequate contingency plans in place should that happen? >> right. >> i fear we do not. >> before we let you go, when these transcripts come out do they evoke any memories for you good or bad about these meetings? >> oh, well they evoke lots of memories. i haven't seen the transcripts of course. i look forward to reviewing it because that was my last full year in office. it was a wonderful experience to be there. i learned an awful lot. and certainly one of the things i reflect on is the various points that we missed that i missed and my colleagues missed. >> william poole, former st. louis fed president, thank you so much for your time. steve, thanks to you for sticking around. >> my pleasure. >> meantime morgan stanley trading sharply higher after reporting results this morning
a fifth year in a row where we are going to have a deficit exceeding a trillion dollars a year. that's the greatest threat to the middle class in america and we are committed to trying to address that problem. that's one of the reasons why i voted against the fiscal cliff deal. the president called for a balanced approach. i think his approach raising taxes is not the way to grow our economy. nonetheless, he indicated there would be spending cuts. there were not. in fact there were spending increases in that bill. host: fix boxer's original assault gun ban. echoing a recent poll that said 30% of those polled are dissatisfied with gun laws, want to see them strengthened. not specific gun laws but, you know, saying we need to reinstitute the assault weapons ban and fix it. guest: well, the evidence -- again, we are certainly willing to listen to proposals that are offered by the president and his commission and by others, but the original assault weapons ban was not a meaningful law because it did not distinguish between the so-called assault weapon and other types of firearms that fir
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
to new gun laws. >> tomorrow, former senators conrad and grade lead a discussion on deficit issues. we will be live starting at 8:30 a.m. eastern on c-span to. and at 1:00 p.m. eastern, chamber of commerce president thomas downey year -- thomas donahue called for immigration legislation. we will be live from the national press club also on c- span to. -- c-span 2. >> he talked about the dream he had, he talked about for years, the american dream. it had been his dream. and he was in detroit a few months before. he talked about -- i have a dream that america will someday realize its principals in the declaration of independence. so i think he is just inspired by that moment. >> sunday, claiborne carson recalls his journey as a civil- rights activist, participating on the 1963 march on washington. it is part of three days of the tv this weekend, monday featuring authors and books on the inauguration. >> president obama officially launched his effort to reduce gun violence wednesday, calling for action in congress and signing 23 executive orders to deal with the issue. speaking before an
get to pay off our deficit. >> the suze orman show airs saturday night at 9:00 p.m. and 12:00 a.m. eastern. you already knew that. >> we're taking a walk on the wild side with patrick monihan. >> no, kate, don't do it. [ female announcer ] what makes florida's natural orange juice taste so uniquely fresh and delicious? is it the rich florida soil? or the perfect blend of sunshine, rain, and temperature? maybe it's the fact that florida's natural oranges are never imported. they're raised right here in florida, and passed with care from our hands to yours. 100% pure. 100% florida. florida's natural. i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. neutrogena®. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. hers hey' to visibly reduce fine lines a
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)